Artists

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Alton Ellis

Paying a fitting tribute to the career of Alton Nehemiah Ellis in just a…

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Ansel Collins

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Augustus Pablo

Born Horace Swaby in Kingston, Jamaica in 1953, Augustus Pablo was and raised in the comfortable middle class suburb of Havendale.

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Barry Biggs

In the mid-seventies, when reggae singers were expected to wear dreadlocks and be wrapped in the colours of the Ethiopian flag, Barry Biggs was considered something of an oddity.

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Big Youth

Few living Jamaican have had a more profound influence on popular music than Manley Augustus Buchanan, a man more familiarly known to the world as Big Youth.

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Bob Andy

In the late sixties, Bob Andy was instrumental in raising social consciousness in Jamaican music to a new level, and by so doing profoundly influencing its future development.

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Bob Marley & The Wailers

The title of ‘legend’ has been ludicrously over-used in recent years, particularly so in the field of popular music, but there are a few cases, where the talent and influence is so great, such injustices do not hold true – Bob Marley & the Wailers being arguably the greatest example of them all.

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Boris Gardiner

Although the manifest talents of Boris Gardiner have beat at the heart of reggae music from its early beginnings he still remains relatively unsung, despite contributing far more to the music than many other more celebrated ‘stars’.

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Bruce Ruffin

Bruce Ruffin has one of the move impressive CVs in the reggae business, having workled with some of the biggest names in the history of Jamaican music, with their number including Duke Reid, Winston Riley, Lloyd Charmers, Herman Chin-Loy and Leslie Kong.

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Candy McKenzie

Of Guyanese parentage, Candy McKenzie spent most of her life in Kilburn, North West London, learning the piano and picking up vocal harmony from her father, a jazz bass player.

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Clancy Eccles

Born in Dean Pen in St Mary’s near Highgate on December 9th 1940…

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Dandy Livingstone

At the height of the ska revival in the late seventies and early eighties, few outside Jamaican music circles were aware that two of the most significant hits of the era were penned and originally performed by Robert Thompson - a man more commonly known as Dandy Livingstone.

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Dave & Ansel Collins

The singer-keyboard dup that formed the charts in 1971 with 'Double Barrel' and 'Monkey Spanner'. See: Dave Barker, Ansel Collins

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Dave Barker

'I am the magnificent, I’m backed by the shack of a soul boast - most thundering storming sound of soul. I am 'W – 0 – 0 - 0' and I’m still up here again' 'Double Barrel' (1970)

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Dennis Brown

Over the past half-century, Jamaica has spawned an array of gifted performers, many of whom have gone on to achieve international recognition for their talent.

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Derrick Morgan

In the early 1960’s, when the Jamaican recording industry was still very much in its infancy, the local music scene was dominated by a mere handful of performers. Among these musical pioneers were Laurel Aitken, Owen Gray, Wilfred ‘Jackie’ Edwards and, of course, Derrick Morgan.

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Desmond Dekker

Throughout this pre-roots era, the name most people in the street would most readily identify with the rhythms of the Caribbean was Desmond Dekker.

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Don Drummond

For those unfamiliar with Don Drummond’s music and the story of his tragic life, it may be difficult to comprehend why, some 47 years since his death, Jamaica still mourns his passing.

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Eric Donaldson

Eric Donaldson’s unrivalled success at the Jamaican Song Festival has resulted in him becoming known as ‘Mr. Festival’, the singer having won the contest a record breaking seven times.

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Ernest Ranglin

Ernest Ranglin is a man of firsts. After being instrumental in the development of ska, he supervised Bob Marley & the Wailers' first release and soon after arranged the first Jamaican hit to break internationally. But that's only half the story.

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Freddie McGregor

Freddie McGregor has remained at the forefront of reggae music for over five decades - a remarkable achievement given the music industry is a business noted for its fierce competitiveness.

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Gregory Isaacs

I recall the time I first met Gregory Anthony Isaacs. He had come to…

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Greyhound

Greyhounds’ roots can be traced back to the 1960s when drummer, Danny Bowen Smith formed the first incarnation of the band that featured singer Freddie Notes, keyboard player Sonny Binns, Errol Denvers on lead guitar and bassist Trevor Ardley White.

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Horace Andy

Horace Andy, born Horace Hinds in Kingston, Jamaica on 19th of February 1951, started his long musical journey in 1967 at the age of sixteen when he made his first recording for Ken Lack’s Caltone label.

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Jackie Edwards

No one, but no one in Jamaica could out-smooth Wilfred ‘Jackie’ Edwards.

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Jimmy Cliff

Widely recognised as one of the true giants of reggae music, Jimmy Cliff launched his recording career in the early sixties while still in his early teens.

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Jimmy Riley

Jimmy Riley's passing on 23rd March 2016 was not just a huge blow to his family, friends, but also all those whose lives have been enhanced by the wonderful music he helped create over the past five decades.

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Joe Gibbs

Joe Gibbs produced some of the most influential and significant recordings ever to see issue in Jamaica.

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Joe Mansano

‘He was the oracle everyone went to when it came to Ska in the…

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John Holt

John Holt was born in Greenwich Town, a seaside community that…

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Johnny Clarke

Johnny Clarke was born in Kingston in January 1955 and he grew up in the district between Waltham Park Road and Maxfield Avenue known as Whitfield Town.

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Judge Dread

Look in many authoritative books on Jamaican music and you will find little or no entry for Alex Hughes, a man more familiarly known as Judge Dread.

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Keith Hudson

Keith Hudson: one of its most interesting and idiosyncratic characters with an insightful writer and creator of a selection of timeless songs and rhythms that will live forever.

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Ken Boothe

Had Ken Boothe been born in Birmingham, Alabama or Memphis...

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King Tubby

Although over two decades have passed since King Tubby was tragically taken from us, he remains one of the most enigmatic personalities in Jamaican music.

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Lee 'Scratch' Perry

For many Jamaican music purists, Reggae reached its creative its…

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Lloyd Charmers

Lloyd Winston Tyrell, a man who became widely known as Lloyd Charmers, was a profound talent, who as a performer, songwriter and producer left an indelible mark upon Jamaica's music industry.

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Lord Tanamo

When the surviving members of the Skatalites reformed at the beginning of this century, they were joined on tour by one of the most influential Jamaican vocalists of all time: Lord Tanamo.

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Lyn Taitt

Born in 1934 in the San Fernando region of Trinidad, Nearlin ‘Lyn’ Taitt displayed an interest in music at an early age, and while still a youth he helped form a neighbourhood steel drum band, later winning an island-wide competition as a soloist.

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Marcia Griffiths

The white hot heat of the reggae business with its insatiable appetite…

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Max Romeo

Max Romeo’s ability over the past four decades to portray and convey with equal fervour and conviction the manifest tribulations of Jamaican life in tandem with its equally amusing aspects have ensured his position as one of the most popular and versatile singers of his generation.

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Millie Small

In the summer of 1964, Millie Small a wide-eyed, innocent young Jamaican country girl became an international celebrity, whose success popularised ska on a global scale and provided the finances to enable Chris Blackwell to establish Island Records as a major force in Popular music. This is her story...

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Nicky Thomas

In the mid seventies, Jamaican music was considered to be ‘en vogue’ with world music followers, which was probably due to the fleeting major label interest at this time. Through the punk/reggae connection the uninitiated discovered already established artists such as Culture, the Mighty Diamonds and the Gladiators. While this new following championed the major label signings they unbelievably dismissed other recognised acts such as Desmond Dekker, Dandy Livingstone and Nicky Thomas as being too commercial!

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Niney The Observer

Niney The Observer a.k.a Winston Holness and born George Boswell, is and will always be a musical innovator and creative genius of comparable calibre.

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Owen Gray

Owen Gray has the distinction of being one of the pioneers of Jamaican music, standing alongside such luminaries as Derrick Morgan, Wilfred ‘Jackie’ Edwards, and Cuban-born Laurel Aitken.

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Phyllis Dillon

In the 1960s and early seventies, Phyllis Dillon was a rarity: a female performer who not only turned out numerous popular singles, but also happened to cut every one of them for a single producer.

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Pluto Shervington

Some might argue that Pluto’s style is nothing more than the Jamaican equivalent of music hall. Others might compare his tales to that of a Calypsonian. But whatever camp you choose with lyrics such as those in his hit, ‘Ram Goat Liver’, based on a traditional Jamaican folk song, he clearly has a unique way of telling a good story.

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Rico

From the Duke Reid Group to the Jools Holland Rhythm & Blues Orchestra, from ghetto studios to the stage of ‘Top Of The Pops’, from the heat of Kingston to the less inspiring climate of suburban London, it had been a long musical and geographical journey for Emmanuel ‘Rico’ Rodriguez

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Roy Shirley

He was one of Jamaica’s most original vocalists, his unique approach and peculiar delivery ensuring a place apart. Credited as the artist who recorded the first rock steady vocal, he scored several lasting hits in the reggae era, yet Roy Shirley remains one of the music’s lesser-known figures, his great contribution rendered unjustly obscure.

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Slim Smith

Widely regarded as one of the finest tenors to have graced Jamaica’s music scene, Keith ‘Slim’ Smith fronted two of the island’s most revered vocal groups during his early career before tasting success as a solo artiste on a scale that few others have equalled.

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Sly & Robbie

The powerhouse rhythm duo of Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare have been at the cutting edge of the Jamaican music scene for over four decades.

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Sonia Pottinger O.D.

Sonia Pottinger O.D. deserves to be regarded as one the greatest Jamaican record producers of all time.

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Susan Cadogan

Though Lee Perry's work with artists such as Leo Graham, the Silvertones and Prince Jazzbo was highly creative and inspired, it was far left-field of the dominant sound of the day, and the Ark’s minimal equipment gave the material a sparseness that was at odds with the successes of his contemporaries. When a big hit finally broke in the UK at the start of 1975, it came from an unknown female vocalist who was then a university librarian.

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The Claredonians

The Clarendonians initially comprised of two childhood friends, Fitzroy (Ernest) Wilson and Peter Austin, who began singing in local talent competitions around their home parish from where they took their name.

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The Ethiopians

Originally called the Ethiopian Children, the Ethiopians were one of Jamaica's most influential vocal groups during their heyday.

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The Fabulous Five

On the album. 'The Fabulous Five Inc.', the liner notes refer to those who “have” to be told that the group famously provided a reggae backing to Johnny Nash and have been voted 'Best Band In The Land' for three consecutive years which is “further testament to the fact that they are doing what they are doing better than anyone else”.

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The Harry J All Stars

The generic group name bestowed by producer Harry Johnson upon those instrumentalists employed for this recording sessions.

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The Heptones

‘Quite frankly there is absolutely no necessity for an introduction…

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The Hippy Boys / The Upsetters

Recording either under their own name or as an anonymous backing combo, the Hippy Boys laid down some of the most satisfying and danceable reggae rhythms that Kingston could offer.

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The In Crowd

If ever a reggae band had inconsequential beginnings it was the In Crowd.

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The Maytals

Few performers can command the respect and admiration widely accorded to Frederick 'Toots' Hibbert.

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The Melodians

The arrival of the laid-back style of rock steady in the summer of 1966 introduced a new wave of groups and of these, none proved more popular than the aptly-named Melodians.

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The Paragons

‘Let’s Go And Have Some Fun, On The Beach, Where There Is A…

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The Pioneers

The Sixties was the golden age for Jamaican vocal trios..

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The Skatalites

The Skatalites defined the sound of Jamaican ska just as surely as the Ventures defined the guitar instrumental, Count Basie defined the sound of swing or the Sex Pistols defined the snarl-and-snot of punk.

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The Tennors

Formed in the mid-sixties by Albert George Murphy, Maurice Johnson and Norman Davis, the Tennors became one of the hottest acts on the Jamaican scene following the release of the debut disc, ‘Pressure And Slide’ in 1967.

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The Upsetters

The Upsetters was the generic group name bestowed by producer Lee 'Scratch' Perry upon any amalgam of instrumentalists employed for this recording sessions.

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U Roy

Considering how much they’ve had to rely on often-vague recollections…

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Zap Pow

Throughout the seventies, Zap Pow was arguably Jamaica’s most…

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